University of Alabama at Birmingham Drucker Lectures Executive Summary Write a critical analysis of ” The Drucker Lectures: Essential Lessons on Management

University of Alabama at Birmingham Drucker Lectures Executive Summary Write a critical analysis of ” The Drucker Lectures: Essential Lessons on Management, Society and Economy”. There will be four main components to the written report: (1) book summary, (2) critical analysis, (3) integration, and a (4) conclusion Advanced Praise for The Drucker Lectures
“Peter Drucker shined a light in a dark and chaotic world, and his words
remain as relevant today as when he ?rst spoke them. Drucker’s lectures
and thoughts deserve to be considered by every person of responsibility,
now, tomorrow, ten years from now, ?fty, and a hundred.”
—Jim Collins, author of Good to Great
and How the Mighty Fall
“Rick Wartzman has brought Peter Drucker alive again, and vividly so,
in his own words. These samples of his talks and lectures, because they
were spoken not written, will be new to almost all of us. A great and unexpected treat.”
—Charles Handy, author of
Myself and Other More Important Matters
“Peter Drucker’s ideas continue to resonate powerfully today. His lectures
on effectiveness, innovation, the social sector, education and so much
more provide fresh insights that extend beyond his other writings and
provide lessons for us all. This book is a gem.”
—Wendy Kopp, CEO and founder of Teach for America
“Rick Wartzman has performed a great service in pulling together The
Drucker Lectures. The collection is as far-ranging as Drucker’s thinking and
writing. If you have sampled Drucker before, you will ?nd things you haven’t
seen. Peter’s ideas live on. You will be energized by reading them anew.”
—Paul O’Neill, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury
“Peter Drucker inspires awe. From the 1940s until his death a few years
ago, he displayed a combination of insight, prescience, and productivity
that few will ever match. This superbly edited collection captures both the
range of Drucker’s thinking and the sweep of history that informed it. The
Drucker Lectures is a riveting read that reveals the depth and subtlety of
one of America’s most remarkable minds.”
—Daniel H. Pink, author of
A Whole New Mind and Drive
“Rick Wartzman really has brought Peter to life in The Drucker Lectures.
Reading this book, I practically felt as though I were seated in the audience, listening to my friend and hero, Peter Drucker—truly one of the
great geniuses of management. These lectures are as vital today as they
were when Peter delivered them. They cover signi?cant territory, from the
importance of faith and the individual to the rise of the global economy.
It’s a classic collection that belongs on every manager’s bookshelf.”
—Ken Blanchard, coauthor of
The One Minute Manager ®
and Leading at a Higher Level
“Thank you, Rick Wartzman, for the pleasure of learning from the witty,
informal Peter Drucker as his ideas unfold and his remarkable mind grapples with challenges of management that are still with us today.”
—Rosabeth Moss Kanter,
Harvard Business School Professor
and author of Con?dence and SuperCorp:
How Vanguard Companies Create Innovation,
Pro?ts, Growth, and Social Good
The
DRUCKER
LECTURES
This page intentionally left blank
The
Drucker
Lectures
E ssential L essons on
M anagement, S ociety, and E conomy
Peter F. Drucker
Edited and with an Introduction by
Rick Wartzman
New York?? Chicago?? San Francisco?? Lisbon?? London
Madrid?? Mexico City?? Milan?? New Delhi?? San Juan?? Seoul
Singapore?? Sydney?? Toronto
Copyright © 2010 by The Drucker Institute. All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the United
States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form
or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of
the publisher.
ISBN: 978-0-07-175950-2
MHID: 0-07-175950-6
The material in this eBook also appears in the print version of this title: ISBN: 978-0-07-170045-0,
MHID: 0-07-170045-5.
All trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners. Rather than put a trademark symbol after
every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use names in an editorial fashion only, and to the benefit
of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Where such designations
appear in this book, they have been printed with initial caps.
McGraw-Hill eBooks are available at special quantity discounts to use as premiums and sales promotions, or for use in corporate training programs. To contact a representative please e-mail us at bulksales@mcgraw-hill.com.
TERMS OF USE
This is a copyrighted work and The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. (“McGrawHill”) and its
licensors reserve all rights in and to the work. Use of this work is subject to these terms.
Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976 and the right to store and retrieve one copy
of the work, you may not decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer, reproduce, modify, create
derivative works based upon, transmit, distribute, disseminate, sell, publish or sublicense the work or
any part of it without McGraw-Hill’s prior consent. You may use the work for your own noncommercial
and personal use; any other use of the work is strictly prohibited. Your right to use the work may be
terminated if you fail to comply with these terms.
THE WORK IS PROVIDED “AS IS.” McGRAW-HILL AND ITS LICENSORS MAKE
NO GUARANTEES OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE ACCURACY, ADEQUACY OR
COMPLETENESS OF OR RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED FROM USING THE WORK, INCLUDING ANY INFORMATION THAT CAN BE ACCESSED THROUGH THE WORK VIA HYPERLINK OR OTHERWISE, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. McGraw-Hill and its licensors do not
warrant or guarantee that the functions contained in the work will meet your requirements or that its
operation will be uninterrupted or error free. Neither McGraw-Hill nor its licensors shall be liable to
you or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error or omission, regardless of cause, in the work or for any
damages resulting therefrom. McGraw-Hill has no responsibility for the content of any information
accessed through the work. Under no circumstances shall McGraw-Hill and/or its licensors be liable
for any indirect, incidental, special, punitive, consequential or similar damages that result from the use
of or inability to use the work, even if any of them has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
This limitation of liability shall apply to any claim or cause whatsoever whether such claim or cause
arises in contract, tort or otherwise.
C O NTE NT S
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ix
Part I
1940s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1. How Is Human Existence Possible? (1943) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. The Myth of the State (1947) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Part II
1950s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3. The Problems of Maintaining Continuous
and Full Employment (1957) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Part III
1960s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
4. The First Technological Revolution and Its Lessons (1965) . . . . . 29
5. Management in the Big Organizations (1967) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Part IV
1970s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
6. Politics and Economics of the Environment (1971). . . . . . . . . . . . 49
7. What We Already Know about American
Education Tomorrow (1971). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
[
v
vi
[
Contents
8. Claremont Address (1974). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
9. Structural Changes in the World Economy and Society
as They Affect American Business (1977) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Part V
1980s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
10. Managing the Increasing Complexity of Large
Organizations (1981). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
11. The Information-Based Organization (1987) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
12. Knowledge Lecture I (1989). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
13. Knowledge Lecture II ((1989) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
14. Knowledge Lecture III (1989). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
15. Knowledge Lecture IV (1989). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
16. Knowledge Lecture V (1989) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Part VI
1990s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
17. The New Priorities (1991) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
18. Do You Know Where You Belong? (1992) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
19. The Era of the Social Sector (1994) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
20. The Knowledge Worker and the Knowledge Society (1994) . . . . . 157
21. Reinventing Government: The Next Phase (1994) . . . . . . . . . . . 165
22. Manage Yourself and Then Your Company (1996) . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Contents
[
vii
23. On Health Care (1996) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
24. The Changing World Economy (1997). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
25. Deregulation and the Japanese Economy (1998) . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
26. Managing Oneself (1999) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
27. From Teaching to Learning (1999) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Part VII
2000s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
28. On Globalization (2001) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
29. Managing the Nonpro?t Organization (2001) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
30. The Future of the Corporation I (2003) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
31. The Future of the Corporation II (2003) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
32. The Future of the Corporation III (2003) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
33. The Future of the Corporation IV (2003) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
About Peter F. Drucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Books by Peter F. Drucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
This page intentionally left blank
INTRO DU CTIO N
Y
ou can picture him perched on the edge of a classroom table, peering
through thick glasses at the students who hang on his every word.
His baritone voice washes over the room, his Austrian accent as thick as
a Sachertorte.
He doesn’t refer to any written notes. But every now and again, his
eyes roll back in his head and he pauses, almost like a computer downloading a store of information, before returning to his point and underscoring it with a new set of facts and ?gures.
His protean mind meanders from topic to topic—a discussion on cost
accounting bleeding into a riff on Mesopotamian city-states before he
veers into a lesson on the history of higher education or health care. But,
somehow, he magically ties it all together in the end. In his hands, discursiveness becomes a ?ne art. And he delivers the entire talk with charm
and humor and a genial style that, as one pupil has put it, recasts “the
chilly lecture hall to the size and comfort of a living room.”
Peter Drucker, widely hailed as the greatest management thinker of
all time, is best known for the 39 books he wrote. Among them are such
classics as Concept of the Corporation (1946); The Practice of Management (1954); The Effective Executive (1967); Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (1973); Innovation and Entrepreneurship (1985); and
Management Challenges for the 21st Century (1999).
But those who had the pleasure of attending a Drucker lecture, before he died in 2005 just shy of his ninety-sixth birthday, got to see another side of him. Featuring lectures from the dawn of the television age
straight through to the Internet age, from World War II to the aftermath of
September 11, 2001, from the ascent into of?ce of Chiang Kai-shek to the
emergence of China as a global economic power, this book is designed to
provide a taste of what that was like.
[
ix
x
[
Introduction
Drucker can be humble and self-deprecating in his comments, variously conceding: “I don’t even know where to begin” and “I know I don’t
make sense.” But mostly he is authoritative, speaking in absolutes. “Not
one government program since 1950 has worked,” he declares in a 1991
address at the Economic Club of Washington.
He can be shockingly bold. For example, in a 2001 lecture, Drucker
goes so far as to call W. Edwards Deming, the quality guru, “totally obsolete.” He can also push too far, suggesting in a 1997 speech on the
changing world economy that “it is anybody’s guess whether there will be
a united Canada in 10 years.”
Many of these lectures are notable for their erudition; an offhand reference to an eighteenth-century politician or a nineteenth-century novelist is not uncommon. At the same time, Drucker was never one to lose his
head in the clouds. “Will you please be terribly nuts-and-bolts-focused in
your questions,” he requests at the end of a lecture at New York University
in 1981, “because we have dealt in the stratosphere much too long.”
Those acquainted with Drucker’s oeuvre will ?nd many familiar themes
here: managing oneself, the value of volunteering, the need for every organization to focus on performance and results. At times, he’d use his
lectures to test out ideas that would later ?nd their way into print—the
classroom serving as a kind of petri dish for his prose.
If there is a single subject that threads through this book it is one
that Drucker spent the last half-century of his career contemplating: the
historic shift from manufacturing to knowledge work. In these lectures,
Drucker explores the implications of engaging our brains, instead of our
brawn, from a variety of angles. He starts in 1957, where his remarks
to an international management conference contain one of his earliest
known references to “people who work by knowledge.”
Yet there are also plenty of fresh insights—and more than a few surprises—to be found in these pages, even for the most diehard Drucker
devotee. As a speaker, Drucker tends to be a bit less formal than in his
writing. He is also apt to personalize his lectures, leavening his oratory
with stories about his wife, Doris, his children, and his grandchildren. The
Introduction
[
xi
shape of the audience can also make things interesting. It is one thing, for
instance, for Drucker to hold forth on the vital importance of nonpro?ts.
But this topic gets a new twist when he contextualizes his thinking for a
group of Japanese.
Perhaps what makes this collection most remarkable, though, is the
sheer span of time that it covers—a testament to Drucker’s long and
extraordinarily productive life. I have attempted to give a glimpse into
the evolution of Drucker’s philosophy by offering brief commentary at the
beginning of each section of this book, which is divided by decade.
The ?rst lecture here is from 1943, when Drucker was being billed in
promotional materials as “stimulating and highly informative” but also
as someone “with his feet on the ground,” capable of communicating “in
terms that the average businessman can understand and appreciate.”
The last lecture, when those exact same traits were still very much on
display (even though Drucker’s own hearing was then failing), came 60
years later, in 2003.
I selected these two talks, along with 31 others in between, with the
help of Bridget Lawlor, the talented archivist at Claremont Graduate University’s Drucker Institute. We looked, speci?cally, for lectures that hadn’t
been published before, at least not in book form. I then edited each one
for clarity and readability. I have also tried to minimize the overlap among
the lectures in this book; you should hear a few faint echoes, but no outright redundancies.
A handful of the lectures were given from behind a lectern, where
Drucker left a polished text to draw from. But most were pulled from
transcripts of videotapes of Drucker speaking more casually in the classroom, and with these I have taken considerably more liberties—cutting
an immense amount of verbiage, moving pieces around, and composing
new transitions. This was major surgery, not a minor cosmetic job, and
these lectures are best thought of as “adapted from” rather than simply
“excerpted from.”
Purists may grumble about this approach. But anyone who wants to
see the originals is welcome to visit Claremont to do so. In the meantime,
xii
[
Introduction
I have tried my best to make this collection accessible and enjoyable while
abiding by a standard that Drucker believed should be the ?rst responsibility of every manager but is sound advice for any editor, as well: Above
all, do no harm.
Rick Wartzman
Claremont, Calif.
The
DRUCKER
LECTURES
This page intentionally left blank
Knowledge has to be improved, challenged, and increased
constantly, or it vanishes.
—PETER F. DRUCKER
This page intentionally left blank
PART I
1940s
B
y the time the 1940s rolled around, many of the seminal events that
would shape Peter Drucker’s core philosophy had already unfolded.
Most notably, the Nazis—who burned and banned some of Drucker’s earliest writings—had swept across Europe, prompting the Austrian native
to leave for England in 1933 and then immigrate to the United States
in 1937. In between, while attending a Cambridge University lecture by
economist John Maynard Keynes, he had an epiphany: “I suddenly realized that Keynes and all the brilliant economic students in the room were
interested in the behavior of commodities while I was interested in the
behavior of people.” In 1939, Drucker wrote The End of Economic Man,
exploring the rise of fascism on the continent he’d left behind. In 1942, he
published The Future of Industrial Man. At its heart was the notion that the
modern corporation had to justify its power and authority, while providing
the individual with dignity, meaning, and status—bedrock beliefs that
would infuse Drucker’s writing for the next six decades. By dissecting the
inner workings of a single enterprise, Drucker’s work took on a new cast
in 1946 with the release of Concept of the Corporation. The book examined
General Motors not just as a business but also as a social entity that
existed in the context of the broader community. Not everyone was impressed with this deep analysis of organization and management—topics
that seemed to fall into a netherworld between politics and economics
and that heretofore were largely unexplored. One reviewer expressed the
hope that Drucker would “now devote his considerable talents to a more
respectable subject.” Thankfully, Drucker declined.
[
1
This page intentionally left blank
1
How Is Human Existence Possible?
1943
T
here has never been a century of Western history so far removed from an awareness of the tragic as that which bequeathed to us two world wars. It has trained all of us to suppress
the tragic, to shut our eyes to it, to deny its existence.
Not quite 200 years ago—in 1755 to be exact—the death of
15,000 men in the Lisbon earthquake was enough to bring down
the structure of traditional Christian belief in Europe. The contemporaries could not make sense of it. They could not reconcile
this horror with the concept of an all-merciful God. And they
cou…
Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
University of Alabama at Birmingham Drucker Lectures Executive Summary Write a critical analysis of ” The Drucker Lectures: Essential Lessons on Management
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay
Homework On Time
Calculate the Price of your PAPER Now
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -

Why Choose Us

Top quality papers

We always make sure that writers follow all your instructions precisely. You can choose your academic level: high school, college/university or professional, and we will assign a writer who has a respective degree.

Professional academic writers

We have hired a team of professional writers experienced in academic and business writing. Most of them are native speakers and PhD holders able to take care of any assignment you need help with.

Free revisions

If you feel that we missed something, send the order for a free revision. You will have 10 days to send the order for revision after you receive the final paper. You can either do it on your own after signing in to your personal account or by contacting our support.

On-time delivery

All papers are always delivered on time. In case we need more time to master your paper, we may contact you regarding the deadline extension. In case you cannot provide us with more time, a 100% refund is guaranteed.

Original & confidential

We use several checkers to make sure that all papers you receive are plagiarism-free. Our editors carefully go through all in-text citations. We also promise full confidentiality in all our services.

24/7 Customer Support

Our support agents are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week and committed to providing you with the best customer experience. Get in touch whenever you need any assistance.

Try it now!

Calculate the price of your order

Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.

Our Services

No need to work on your paper at night. Sleep tight, we will cover your back. We offer all kinds of writing services.

Essays

Essay Writing Service

You are welcome to choose your academic level and the type of your paper. Our academic experts will gladly help you with essays, case studies, research papers and other assignments.

Admissions

Admission help & business writing

You can be positive that we will be here 24/7 to help you get accepted to the Master’s program at the TOP-universities or help you get a well-paid position.

Reviews

Editing your paper

Our academic writers and editors will help you submit a well-structured and organized paper just on time. We will ensure that your final paper is of the highest quality and absolutely free of mistakes.

Reviews

Revising your paper

Our academic writers and editors will help you with unlimited number of revisions in case you need any customization of your academic papers