Alabama State University Managing Information Systems Discussion 1200 words total. 3 APA cited reference and reference list. NO PLAGIARISM PLEASE!!! 1.( 4

Alabama State University Managing Information Systems Discussion 1200 words total. 3 APA cited reference and reference list. NO PLAGIARISM PLEASE!!!

1.( 400 words )How do information technologies contribute to the business success of Sew What? Inc.? Give several examples from the case regarding the business value of information technology that demonstrate this conclusion.

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Alabama State University Managing Information Systems Discussion 1200 words total. 3 APA cited reference and reference list. NO PLAGIARISM PLEASE!!! 1.( 4
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

2.( 400 words ) If you were a management consultant to Sew What? Inc., what would you advise Megan Duckett to do at this point to be even more successful in her business?

3.(400 words ) How could the use of information technology help a small business you know to be more successful? Provide at least three examples to support your answer.

QUESTION 4, 250 WORDS TOTAL. 2 APA cited references and reference list. NO PLAGIARISM PLEASE. obr76817_fm_i-xxxiv_1.indd Page i 8/25/10 2:00 PM F-497
MANAGEMENT
INFORMATION
SYSTEMS
/Users/F-497/Desktop/Tempwork/AUGUST 2010/18:08:10/FREE036:Volhart:VYN
V
I
C
K
E
R
S
,
T
E
A
R
D
R
A
1
1
9
1
T
S
obr76817_fm_i-xxxiv_1.indd Page ii 8/25/10 2:00 PM F-497
/Users/F-497/Desktop/Tempwork/AUGUST 2010/18:08:10/FREE036:Volhart:VYN
V
I
C
K
E
R
S
,
T
E
A
R
D
R
A
1
1
9
1
T
S
obr76817_fm_i-xxxiv_1.indd Page iii 8/25/10 2:00 PM F-497
MANAGEMENT
INFORMATION
SYSTEMS
Tenth Edition
James A. O’Brien
College of Business Administration
Northern Arizona University
George M. Marakas
KU School of Business
University of Kansas
/Users/F-497/Desktop/Tempwork/AUGUST 2010/18:08:10/FREE036:Volhart:VYN
V
I
C
K
E
R
S
,
T
E
A
R
D
R
A
1
1
9
1
T
S
obr76817_ch01_002-044.indd Page 2 7/28/10 10:10 AM user
/Volumes/207/MHSF191/foe85387_disk1of1/0073385387/foe85387_pagefiles
Management
Challenges
MODULE I
Business
Applications
@bWh_X
< Development Processes Information Technologies Foundation Concepts FOUNDATION CONCEPTS V I C systems? Why do businesses need information hy study information technology? What K do you need to know about the use and management of information technologies in business? The introductory E chapters of Module I are designed to answer these fundamental questions about the role of information systems in business. R of Information Systems in Business presents an • Chapter 1: Foundations S overview of the five basic areas of information systems knowledge needed by , business professionals, including the conceptual system components and major W • types of information systems. In addition, trends in information systems and an overview of the managerial challenges associated with information systems are T presented. E Information Technology introduces fundamental Chapter 2: Competing with concepts of competitive advantage through information technology and illusA trates major strategic applications of information systems. R Completing these chapters will prepare you to move on to study chapters D(Module II), business applications (Module III), on information technologies systems development processes R (Module IV), and the management challenges of information systems (Module V). A 1 1 9 1 T S 2 obr76817_ch01_002-044.indd Page 3 09/09/10 9:50 AM user-f501 207/MHRL043/kno31619_disk1of1/0070131619/kno31619_pagefiles: Management Challenges CHAPTER 1 Business Applications Module I Development Processes Information Technologies Foundation Concepts FOUNDATIONS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN BUSINESS VI Ch apt er Highligh t s Section I Foundation Concepts: Information Systems in Business The Real World of Information Systems Real World Case: eCourier, Cablecom, and Bryan Cave: Delivering Value Through Business Intelligence The Fundamental Roles of IS in Business Trends in Information Systems The Role of e-Business in Business Types of Information Systems Managerial Challenges of Information Technology Section II Foundation Concepts: The Components of Information Systems System Concepts: A Foundation Real World Case: The New York Times and Boston Scientific: Two Different Ways of Innovating with Information Technology Components of Information Systems Information System Resources Information System Activities Recognizing Information Systems Real World Case: Sew What? Inc.: The Role of Information Technology in Small Business Success Real World Case: JetBlue and the Veterans Administration: The Critical Importance of IT Processes C K L ea r n i n g O bj ect i v e s E the concept of a system and how it R 1. Understand relates to information systems. S 2. Explain why knowledge of information systems is important for business professionals, and identify , T E A R D R A 1 1 9 1 T S 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. five areas of information systems knowledge that they need. Give examples to illustrate how the business applications of information systems can support a firm’s business processes, managerial decision making, and strategies for competitive advantage. Provide examples of several major types of information systems from your experiences with business organizations in the real world. Identify several challenges that a business manager might face in managing the successful and ethical development and use of information technology in a business. Provide examples of the components of real world information systems. Illustrate that in an information system, people use hardware, software, data, and networks as resources to perform input, processing, output, storage, and control activities that transform data resources into information products. Demonstrate familiarity with the myriad of career opportunities in information systems. 3 obr76817_ch01_002-044.indd Page 4 7/28/10 10:10 AM user 4 ● /Volumes/207/MHSF191/foe85387_disk1of1/0073385387/foe85387_pagefiles Module I / Foundation Concepts SECTION I Foundation Concepts: Information Systems in Business The question of why we need to study information systems and information technology has evolved into a moot issue. Information systems have become as integrated into our daily business activities as accounting, finance, operations management, marketing, human resource management, or any other major business function. Information systems and technologies are vital components of successful businesses and organizations—some would say they are business imperatives. They thus constitute an essential field of study in business administration and management, which is why most business majors include a course in information systems. Since you probably intend to be a manager, entrepreneur, or business professional,V it is just as important to have a basic understanding of information systems as it is to understand any other functional area in business. Information technologies, Iincluding Internet-based information systems, are playing vital and expanding roles in Cbusiness. Information technology can help all kinds of businesses improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their business processes, manaK gerial decision making, and workgroup collaboration, which strengthens their competitive positions in rapidly changing marketplaces. This benefit occurs irrespective of E whether the information technology is used to support product development teams, R customer support processes, e-commerce transactions, or any other business activity. Information technologies andSsystems are, quite simply, an essential ingredient for business success in today’s dynamic global environment. , The Real World of Information Systems Let’s take a moment to bring the real world into our discussion of the importance of information systems (IS) and information technology (IT). See Figure 1.1, and read T information technology to better understand and the Real World Case about using satisfy customer needs. E If we are to understand information systems and their functions, we first need to A In its simplest form, a system is a set of interrebe clear on the concept of a system. lated components, with a clearly R defined boundary, working together to achieve a common set of objectives. Using this definition, it becomes easy to see that virtually D everything you can think of is a system, and one system can be made up of other sysR We will expand on this concept later in the next tems or be part of a bigger system. section, but for now, this definition gives us a good foundation for understanding the A focus of this textbook: information systems. What Is an Information System? We begin with a simple definition that we can expand upon later in the chapter. An information system (IS) can be1any organized combination of people, hardware, software, communications networks, 1 data resources, and policies and procedures that stores, retrieves, transforms, and disseminates information in an organization. People 9 rely on modern information systems to communicate with one another using a variety of physical devices (hardware)1, information processing instructions and procedures (software), communications channels (networks), and stored data (data resources). AlT are typically thought of as having something to do though today’s information systems with computers, we have beenSusing information systems since the dawn of civilization. Even today we make regular use of information systems that have nothing to do with a computer. Consider some of the following examples of information systems: • Smoke signals for communication were used as early as recorded history and can account for the human discovery of fire. The pattern of smoke transmitted valuable information to others who were too far to see or hear the sender. • Card catalogs in a library are designed to store data about the books in an organized manner that allows readers to locate a particular book by its title, author name, subject, or a variety of other approaches. obr76817_ch01_002-044.indd Page 5 7/28/10 10:10 AM user /Volumes/207/MHSF191/foe85387_disk1of1/0073385387/foe85387_pagefiles Chapter 1 / Foundations of Information Systems in Business REAL WORLD CASE V 1 5 eCourier, Cablecom, and Bryan Cave: Delivering Value through Business Intelligence isitors to the eCourier Web site are greeted with the words “How happy are you? Take the eCourier happy test today!” Those words and the playful purple Web site represent the company’s customer satisfaction focus. And the company achieves that happiness through its focus on operational business intelligence. Business intelligence is moving out of the ivory tower of specialized analysts and is being brought to the front lines. In the case of eCourier, whose couriers carry 2,000 packages around London each day, operational business intelligence allows the company to keep real-time tabs on customer satisfaction. “This is a crucial differentiator in London’s competitive same-day courier market, where clients are far more likely to take their business elsewhere than they are to report a problem to their current courier,” says the company’s chief technology officer and cofounder Jay Bregman. Just one online directory, London Online, shows about 350 listings for courier services. Before implementing operational business intelligence, eCourier sought to define IT as a crucial differentiator. Cofounders Tom Allason, eCourier’s CEO, and Bregman ditched the idea of phone dispatchers and instead gave their couriers GPS-enabled handhelds so that couriers can be tracked and orders can be communicated electronically. They also focused on making online booking easy and rewarding, and much was invested in user-friendly applications: Customers can track online exactly where their courier is, eliminating the package delivery guesswork. Today, 95 percent of deliveries are booked online; this means that eCourier needs a much smaller staff for monitoring, tracking, and placing orders, which in turn makes the company more scalable. Bregman says this is notable in V I C K E R S , T E A R D R A F IGUR E 1.1 1 1 9 1 T S Access to quality information about customers helps companies succeed at delivering value to shareholders. Source: © Digital Vision/Alamy. ● a market where many courier companies use telephone dispatchers and guesswork about package whereabouts. Booking and tracking automation—although innovative—did not complete the customer happiness puzzle. Without leadingedge business intelligence, account managers could miss the same issues that plagued other courier services—late deliveries, surly couriers, or even an unnoticed ramp-up in deliveries. “We’re only one delivery away from someone deciding to use a different delivery firm,” says Bregman. So eCourier started to use software from a company called SeeWhy to try to generate customer data more quickly. “What’s unique about SeeWhy,” says Bregman, “is its ability to report what’s happening with customers instantly.” When a new booking enters eCourier’s database, the information is duplicated and saved into a repository within SeeWhy. The software then interprets the data by comparing it with previous information and trends, and if it notices an anomaly, it takes action. If a customer typically places an eCourier order every Thursday morning between 9:30 and 10:00 and there’s been no contact during that time, eCourier’s CRM team will receive an alert shortly after 10:00 that includes the client’s history and the number of bookings it typically places in a day. Bregman says there’s a fair amount of fine-tuning to get the metrics right. For example, the company had to tweak the system to recognize expected shifts in activity so that it doesn’t send a slew of alerts once the after-Christmas drop in business occurs. Getting that perfect balance of when to send alerts and how best to optimize the system is an ongoing process, he says. The SeeWhy software is designed to establish a “normal” client booking pattern from the first use, which is deepened with each subsequent booking. A sharp drop-off in bookings, an increase in bookings, or a change in dormant account activity generates an alert that is sent to that client’s account manager; the manager uses the opportunity to problem-solve or, in the case of increased activity, upsell to overnight or international services. “These capabilities have provided a big payoff,” says Bregman. He also believes the system saves his company the expense of having to hire people to monitor “who’s happy and who’s not—we’re able to do a lot more on our customer team with a lot less.” Other approaches to judging customer dissatisfaction exist. Cablecom, a Swiss telecom company, used SPSS’s statistical software to mine customer data, primarily from trouble tickets—such as the average duration of a ticket, or how many tickets had been opened for a customer over a specific time period—to build a model that could flag when a customer was at a high risk of leaving. “But the model proved to be only about 70 percent accurate,” says Federico Cesconi, director of customer insight and retention. So Cesconi used SPSS’s Dimensions survey research software to create an online customer survey, and from that he was able to determine that customer dissatisfaction usually begins around the ninth month of service, with the bulk of the customer losses occurring between months 12 and 14. Cesconi then created another survey that he now offers to obr76817_ch01_002-044.indd Page 6 7/28/10 10:11 AM user 6 ● /Volumes/207/MHSF191/foe85387_disk1of1/0073385387/foe85387_pagefiles Module I / Foundation Concepts customers in the seventh month of service, which includes an area where they can type in specific complaints and problems. “Cablecom calls customers within 24 hours of completing the survey,” says Cesconi. “The two approaches together provide the best view of customers ready to bolt, and the best chance at retaining them.” In 2002, global law firm Bryan Cave faced the milliondollar question: How do you make the most money with your resources while simultaneously delivering the highest customer value? The problem was pressing. Clients of the firm, which now has 800 lawyers in 15 offices worldwide, were demanding alternatives to the traditional hourly fee structure. They wanted new models, such as fixed pricing and pricing that was adjusted during a project. But making money from these new billing strategies required the complicated balance of staffing and pricing. Projects weighted too heavily with a law partner’s time would be expensive (for the law firm) and not optimized for profit. Devoting too little of a partner’s time would leave clients feeling undervalued. Optimizing profit and perceived value had to be achieved by spreading partners’ time throughout a number of cases and balancing the remaining resources needed for a case with the less-expensive fees of associates and paralegals. “Clients are most likely to stay with you if you deliver just the right mix,” says Bryan Cave’s CIO John Alber. The law firm’s traditional method of analyzing collected fees and profit used a spreadsheet that was complicated and took too long. “Spreadsheets provide a level of detail that can be valuable for analysts,” says Alber, “but the information in a spreadsheet can be confusing and difficult to work with.” Alber says he decided it was better to build an easy-to-understand interface using business intelligence tools. Although the company will not release specific figures, both profitability and hours leveraged—the hours worked by equity partners and all other fee earners at the firm—have increased substantially since the company implemented its first BI tool in 2004, according to Alber. The tools also allow lawyers to track budgets in real time so that they can make adjustments quickly. The BI tools CASE STUDY QUESTIONS 1. How do information technologies contribute to the business success of the companies depicted in the case? Provide an example from each company explaining how the technology implemented led to improved performance. 2. In the case of law firm Bryan Cave discussed above, the use of BI technology to improve the availability, access, and presentation of existing information allowed them to provide tailored and innovative services to their customers. What other professions could benefit from a similar use of these technologies, and how? Develop two different possibilities. 3. Cablecom developed a prediction model to better identify those customers at risk of switching to other company in the near future. In addition to those noted in the case, what other actions could be taken if that information were available? Give some examples of these. Would you consider letting some customers leave anyway? Why? even provide a diversity dashboard, which tracks the hourly mix of women and minorities working on the firm’s cases, a feature the company will license to Redwood Analytics for sale to other law firms. The firm developed this diversity tool to bring transparency to the diversity reporting process required by many clients. In other words, the tools provide Bryan Cave with a method of customizing its fees and helping clients better understand what they get for their money. As an illustration, Alber points to the customized pricing one lawyer gave to his real estate client. “Developers think in terms of square feet,” says Alber, “and this client couldn’t understand why legal fees for a 400,000-square-foot building might be the same as for a 4,000-square-foot building, though it required the same amount of the lawyer’s time.” So the lawused the pricing and staffing modeling tools and historical Vyer analysis tools to determine whether it made sense for the law I firm to charge clients based on the size of their projects. He found that while there was risk of underpricing large Cbuildings, the deal volume in small buildings offset that risk for Kthe law firm. The result made per-square-foot pricing possible. “It may be possible that someone with enough willpower Eor manpower could do that using traditional analysis,” says “but this lawyer had the information right at his finRAlber, gertips.” Business intelligence enables “us to be in touch Swith clients and shift things around in response to what cusare asking,” says Alber. Adopting new and improved , tomers project management, pricing, and customer service capabilities required planning, appropriate pacing, and user buy-in. “In today’s environment, you can’t do value innovation Twithout being in touch with the economics of your business, really understanding where you make money and Ewithout where you don’t, and that’s what business intelligence tools Ado,” says Alber. “Our goal,” he says, “is to build the best longterm relationships in the world.” R Source: Adapted from Diann Daniel, “Deliveri... Purchase answer to see full attachment

Homework On Time
Calculate the Price of your PAPER Now
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -

Why Choose Us

Top quality papers

We always make sure that writers follow all your instructions precisely. You can choose your academic level: high school, college/university or professional, and we will assign a writer who has a respective degree.

Professional academic writers

We have hired a team of professional writers experienced in academic and business writing. Most of them are native speakers and PhD holders able to take care of any assignment you need help with.

Free revisions

If you feel that we missed something, send the order for a free revision. You will have 10 days to send the order for revision after you receive the final paper. You can either do it on your own after signing in to your personal account or by contacting our support.

On-time delivery

All papers are always delivered on time. In case we need more time to master your paper, we may contact you regarding the deadline extension. In case you cannot provide us with more time, a 100% refund is guaranteed.

Original & confidential

We use several checkers to make sure that all papers you receive are plagiarism-free. Our editors carefully go through all in-text citations. We also promise full confidentiality in all our services.

24/7 Customer Support

Our support agents are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week and committed to providing you with the best customer experience. Get in touch whenever you need any assistance.

Try it now!

Calculate the price of your order

Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.

Our Services

No need to work on your paper at night. Sleep tight, we will cover your back. We offer all kinds of writing services.

Essays

Essay Writing Service

You are welcome to choose your academic level and the type of your paper. Our academic experts will gladly help you with essays, case studies, research papers and other assignments.

Admissions

Admission help & business writing

You can be positive that we will be here 24/7 to help you get accepted to the Master’s program at the TOP-universities or help you get a well-paid position.

Reviews

Editing your paper

Our academic writers and editors will help you submit a well-structured and organized paper just on time. We will ensure that your final paper is of the highest quality and absolutely free of mistakes.

Reviews

Revising your paper

Our academic writers and editors will help you with unlimited number of revisions in case you need any customization of your academic papers