What Am I Going to Do with This Guy Management Scenario Paper MANAGEMENT SCENARIO:WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THIS GUY? You just got a phone call from a Gro

What Am I Going to Do with This Guy Management Scenario Paper MANAGEMENT SCENARIO:WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THIS GUY? You just got a phone call from a Group Marketing Director at Frito-Lay that every Group Business Director dreads. And fortunately, it was not the “I’m putting the brand up for review” phone call. But it was a bad phone call.You took a lot of notes; drew a lot of boxes and arrows; written down words that your mother would never would have allowed you to say indoors or in her company; and the conversation ended with the GPD saying to you, “so to confirm, Scott Brown comes off Project Zeus immediately and we’ll meet on Friday afternoon at 2:30pm at the agency to review the new account team leadership structure. I’ll see you Thursday”. It’s Tuesday afternoon at 4:20pm when you hang up the phone. Some background … Scott Brown is an Account Director in your group. He oversees the F-L potato chip portfolio as well as a high profile new product assignment. Scott is a brilliant man. Stalwart undergraduate degree. MBA from a “named” business school. Solid consumer brand experience at big-time New York and Chicago agencies. Stellar interview feedback. And two pretty solid annual performance reviews since he’s been at the agency. On paper, Scott Brown is an Account Management “poster boy”. During last summer’s account management “resource planning” meeting, both the agency’s President and Director of Client Service agree with the Group Business Director on Procter & Gamble – who initially hired Scott to work on the P&G business – that “it’s time for Scott to move to another account, and that Frito-Lay would be a great fit with his skills and background”.And this actually works out great for you as you needed to rotate one of the Account Directors in your group to broaden her experience and manage her career path. And even though you had never really spent “quality” time with Scott, the endorsement from his current GBD as well as the agency’s senior management indicated this would be a “win-win” for all concerns. You agree to put the “ball in play” and move Scott into your group. How we got to now …The first six months of Scott being on the Frito-Lay team were great. Solid thinking being put forward. The work was getting better. His “fit” with the team client and the agency team was terrific and all seemed to be on an upward trajectory. So, when you get the call from Frito-Lay regarding the agency putting together a “team” to work on Project Zeus, a new product innovation launch they have in their growth pipeline, you have no qualms in saying, “Scott’s most likely going to be the guy to lead this …let me run the internal trap lines and I’ll get back to you this afternoon”. You discuss internally, everyone agrees with your “Scott’s the guy” assertion and you confirm things with the client. As Zeus is the strategy development stage, you collect your thoughts by taking a walk around the floor. Upon returning to your office, you call the Planning Director on Frito-Lay and ask if she can come on down for a quick update on Zeus. When the Planning Director knocks on your door it is as if she knows what you want totalk about, as she has that undeniable we NEED to talk look on her face. She comes in, closes the door, sits down and the very first words out of her mouth are, “Scott can’t lead” … his lack of leadership on Zeus is killing us. The client, I think, may even be questioning if we are the right agency for this project”. I spend the greater portion of the next hour with the Planning Director just listening. The meeting with the Planning Director breaks, and I call HR and ask if I can come down to review Scott’s personnel file. Did I miss something when I reviewed his file last summer after the account management planning/resource meeting? Did I miss something when I met with him prior to his joining the Frito-Lay team? Did we miss something when we hired him? I spend the greater part of the next hour with the HR Director discussing Scott’s performance. But on paper, as well as in my personal recollection, Scott’s performance does not “tick & tie” with the Planning Director’s take on things. And the first six months of Scott’s run were great. What gives? My next port-of-call is the Group Business Director on Procter & Gamble. And it takes me the better part of a day to get time with him due to our collective schedules. However, when we do get together, the first thing I get is, “yeah, I’ve heard about Scott … I was hoping that he’d take on much more of a leadership mantle after our discussion following his last review”.I was stunned. “Whoa, whoa, whoa …stop the clock. You knew?You knew there was a leadership issue with this guy … seriously?”In pressing the leadership issue a bit further, it turns out that Scott is very effective and consistent high performer in a team setting. A team setting is his true comfort zone. This is where he flourishes. “Scott’s a great Offensive Coordinator, my colleague states. “He’s fine being the second in command. And in his review, we did talk at great length about his needing to step it up. And I was hoping that a move into your group would be just what he needed. But now I’m thinking he’ll ever be in the running to be a Head Coach. I guess it’s just not in his DNA. But he’s a great account guy nonetheless.” With possibly the worst poker-face of all time, I respond, “OK, fine …but why didn’t you make any note of this rather significant issue in his performance review? And why didn’t you say anything to me, either as part of the RPA meeting, or at the very least in a sidebar conversation, regarding this ‘leadership’ thing with Scott?Do you realize what kind of hole you’re lack of transparency has put us in on Frito-Lay? …let alone the hole you’ve put Scott in?”“Come on, we’re going to talk to Howard (the agency’s CEO) about this.” You’ve got a little less than 36 hours to come up with both a suitable and sustainable “fix” for the account management leadership on Project Zeus. What are you thinking following both the phone call with the Group Marketing Director at Frito-Lay; your meeting with the Planning Director; your review of Scott’s file; and finally, the conversation you had with your colleague, the agency’s Group Business Director of P&G? How do you plan to address this issue from an immediate staffing standpoint?From an organizational standpoint what does the Scott Brown situation tell you about the current state of the agency’s performance management process? MANAGEMENT SCENARIO: WHAT AM I GOING TO DO WITH THIS GUY?
You just got a phone call from a Group Marketing Director at Frito-Lay that every Group Business
Director dreads. And fortunately, it was not the “I’m putting the brand up for review” phone call. But it
was a bad phone call. You took a lot of notes; drew a lot of boxes and arrows; written down words that
your mother would never would have allowed you to say indoors or in her company; and the
conversation ended with the GPD saying to you, “so to confirm, Scott Brown comes off Project Zeus
immediately and we’ll meet on Friday afternoon at 2:30pm at the agency to review the new account
team leadership structure. I’ll see you Thursday”. It’s Tuesday afternoon at 4:20pm when you hang up
the phone.
Some background … Scott Brown is an Account Director in your group. He oversees the F-L potato chip
portfolio as well as a high profile new product assignment. Scott is a brilliant man. Stalwart
undergraduate degree. MBA from a “named” business school. Solid consumer brand experience at bigtime New York and Chicago agencies. Stellar interview feedback. And two pretty solid annual
performance reviews since he’s been at the agency. On paper, Scott Brown is an Account Management
“poster boy”.
During last summer’s account management “resource planning” meeting, both the agency’s President
and Director of Client Service agree with the Group Business Director on Procter & Gamble – who
initially hired Scott to work on the P&G business – that “it’s time for Scott to move to another account,
and that Frito-Lay would be a great fit with his skills and background”. And this actually works out great
for you as you needed to rotate one of the Account Directors in your group to broaden her experience
and manage her career path. And even though you had never really spent “quality” time with Scott, the
endorsement from his current GBD as well as the agency’s senior management indicated this would be a
“win-win” for all concerns. You agree to put the “ball in play” and move Scott into your group.
How we got to now …The first six months of Scott being on the Frito-Lay team were great. Solid thinking
being put forward. The work was getting better. His “fit” with the team client and the agency team was
terrific and all seemed to be on an upward trajectory. So, when you get the call from Frito-Lay regarding
the agency putting together a “team” to work on Project Zeus, a new product innovation launch they
have in their growth pipeline, you have no qualms in saying, “Scott’s most likely going to be the guy to
lead this …let me run the internal trap lines and I’ll get back to you this afternoon”. You discuss
internally, everyone agrees with your “Scott’s the guy” assertion and you confirm things with the client.
As Zeus is the strategy development stage, you collect your thoughts by taking a walk around the floor.
Upon returning to your office, you call the Planning Director on Frito-Lay and ask if she can come on
down for a quick update on Zeus. When the Planning Director knocks on your door it is as if she knows
what you want totalk about, as she has that undeniable we NEED to talk look on her face. She comes in,
closes the door, sits down and the very first words out of her mouth are, “Scott can’t lead” … his lack of
leadership on Zeus is killing us. The client, I think, may even be questioning if we are the right agency for
this project”. I spend the greater portion of the next hour with the Planning Director just listening.
The meeting with the Planning Director breaks, and I call HR and ask if I can come down to review
Scott’s personnel file. Did I miss something when I reviewed his file last summer after the account
management planning/resource meeting? Did I miss something when I met with him prior to his joining
the Frito-Lay team? Did we miss something when we hired him? I spend the greater part of the next
hour with the HR Director discussing Scott’s performance. But on paper, as well as in my personal
recollection, Scott’s performance does not “tick & tie” with the Planning Director’s take on things. And
the first six months of Scott’s run were great. What gives?
My next port-of-call is the Group Business Director on Procter & Gamble. And it takes me the better part
of a day to get time with him due to our collective schedules. However, when we do get together, the
first thing I get is, “yeah, I’ve heard about Scott … I was hoping that he’d take on much more of a
leadership mantle after our discussion following his last review”. I was stunned. “Whoa, whoa, whoa
…stop the clock. You knew? You knew there was a leadership issue with this guy … seriously?” In
pressing the leadership issue a bit further, it turns out that Scott is very effective and consistent high
performer in a team setting. A team setting is his true comfort zone. This is where he flourishes. “Scott’s
a great Offensive Coordinator, my colleague states. “He’s fine being the second in command. And in his
review, we did talk at great length about his needing to step it up. And I was hoping that a move into
your group would be just what he needed. But now I’m thinking he’ll ever be in the running to be a Head
Coach. I guess it’s just not in his DNA. But he’s a great account guy nonetheless.”
With possibly the worst poker-face of all time, I respond, “OK, fine …but why didn’t you make any note
of this rather significant issue in his performance review? And why didn’t you say anything to me, either
as part of the RPA meeting, or at the very least in a sidebar conversation, regarding this ‘leadership’
thing with Scott? Do you realize what kind of hole you’re lack of transparency has put us in on FritoLay? …let alone the hole you’ve put Scott in?” “Come on, we’re going to talk to Howard (the agency’s
CEO) about this.”
You’ve got a little less than 36 hours to come up with both a suitable and sustainable “fix” for the
account management leadership on Project Zeus. What are you thinking following both the phone call
with the Group Marketing Director at Frito-Lay; your meeting with the Planning Director; your review of
Scott’s file; and finally, the conversation you had with your colleague, the agency’s Group Business
Director of P&G? How do you plan to address this issue from an immediate staffing standpoint? From an
organizational standpoint what does the Scott Brown situation tell you about the current state of the
agency’s performance management process?
● Our case submissions are to be no longer than four (4) double-spaced,
typewritten pages. And please use a sans-serif font (e.g. Helvetica, Tahoma,etc.)
at a size no smaller than 10.5 points.
● Case Analysis Outline
○ Using the following outline:
■ Purpose: Statement of the problem or key issue
■ Background/Situation Analysis
■ Discussion of Alternatives
■ Recommendation/Rationale
■ Action Plan/Next Steps
■ Contingency Plan
limit your analysis to five (3) double-spaced, typewritten pages.
● Purpose: Statement of the problem or key issue
Some examples:
The purpose of this correspondence is to outline the recommended approach,
budget and next steps for implementing a 49/59/69 value menu
pricing test in paired HB and LB index markets during Q3.
The purpose of this memo is to provide the results of the Q3 49/59/69 value
menu pricing test in the paired HB and LB markets and outline the impact and
implications of the results for the upcoming FY planning and budget.
Using Q2 competitive advertising spend data, the purpose of this memo is to
provide an analysis and recommended funding levels required to match
competitive SOV in “heartland” markets.
The key to the purpose is to clearly articulate why you are providing this analysis and
what will be the outcome(s). Be succinct in your approach and use words that paint a
very clear picture of the issue at hand.
● Background/Situation Analysis
This is where you paint the picture of why there is a problem or an issue in the first
place. Again, you need to succinctly and clearly state the facts, as well as address
“why we are where we are”. The latter can be driven internally (people, product,
process, legal, financial, etc.); by a client and/or competitor; etc. In writing the situation
analysis it is imperative that you pay as much attention to the “facts” as presented in
the case as to the “facts” that either seem to be missing or are somewhat conspicuous
by their absence. Is there an underlying issue or concern that is at the heart of the
issue that has not surfaced or being considered? This is a foundational element of your
analysis, but remember, you are not writing Tolstoy here.
BE BRIEF; BE FOCUSED; DO NOT RECOUNT THE CASE; GET TO THE POINT / KEY
ISSUE(S) OF THE CASE QUICKLY.
● Discussion of Alternatives
By delineating for two or three alternatives in clear and concise declarative
sentences, you make it extremely clear for management to understand the
courses of action you have researched/developed and are available to them for
consideration. Depending on the complexity and variables associated with the
alternatives, it may be worthwhile to develop an outline of the “pros” and “cons”
so that management can easily see the risks and rewards associated for each
alternative, and the potential impact/implication each has on the business as a
result. You will need to consider whether or not this level of detail is required
literally on a case-by-case basis.
● Recommendation/Rationale
Once you have analyzed and put forth alternative solution scenarios, you are
now ready to make your recommendation. It is now time for you to step up,
stand up and to put it on the line. This is the point in the process where you
make a strong, persuasive and well-articulated argument supporting your
recommended course of action derived from the list of alternatives you have
developed. This is not the time to be wishy-washy. If you do not deliver a strong
and impassioned argument, you will not sell management on your
recommendation. Now this does not mean you can concoct any impassioned
argument and win – you need to support you recommendation with facts,
observations and anticipated outcomes.
Your recommendation should be a straightforward statement followed by bulletpointed rationale points.
● Action Plan/Next Steps
Once you have made a decision, now you have to activate the support plan.
This is the next step in your case study write-up. The key items for management
will be a clear outline of the timeframe and the funding involved in implementing
the recommendation as stated. These are crucial items for management
alignment and approval.
For example, going back to the “…match competitive SOV in the ‘heartland’
markets.” scenario from the Purpose section, the Action Plan/Next Steps
section might look something like this:
To implement the match competitive SOV levels in “heartland markets requires
the following next steps:
1.
For the “heartland” markets, authorize incremental spot TV spending of
$9.25 million and increase T&R spend from $65K to $81.7K for the balance of
the year by 6/1;
2.
Develop and approve media plan that details the incremental spend by
6/15;
3.
Develop and approve updated creative rotation in “heartland” markets for
balance of the year by 6/15;
4.
Update and finalize T&R budget for balance of year by 6/15;
5.
Upon approval of SOV match plans, activate & air by 6/30;
6.
Measure impact of SOV match plan in “heartland” markets during Q1.
In addition, given that we are doing business in the “age of accountability” you
will most likely need to put in some performance metrics and/or milestones
against which you can gage the progress, traction and success you are making.
Be realistic …be honest…be confident. And remember, nothing in this business
happens all that quickly, so set realistic expectations for implementation and
measurement.
● Contingency Plan
While you recommendation has been well thought out, based on the facts at
hand, and vetted at various management levels within the “organization”, there
are unforeseen twists and turns in the economy, competitive landscape and the
consumer. And while you cannot predict the future, you do need to have a “Plan
B” — what you would do “if”. Your contingency plan need not be long. Just
simple statement along the lines of: if this happens (or does not happen), we will
do this. Again, you need to give management some reasonable assurance that
you have the backdoor covered.
● In Closing…
The case analysis process is designed to give you the opportunity to take a
crack at solving real world problems. And as you move forward into the world of
advertising you will find that your day-to-day activities will really be nothing
more than a series of “mini” case studies. However, the case studies in the real
world will not arrive all neat and tidy in a pdf format. Enjoy.
★ Case #1: Congratulations, You’ve Been Selected
1. Advertising Management Today
2. Managing People In An IMC Wo
★ Case #2: New Business Knows No Clock
Managing People
★ Case #3: What Am I Going to Do With This Guy?
1. Managing People
2. Performance Management

1.
2.
3.
Case #4: Help Me Get There From Here
Advertising Planning 1.0
Advertising Planning 2.0“
Client-Agency Relationships” (ADV 330 Reference folder)
★ Case #5: Stick To The Core or Go For More
1. •Agency P&L
2. Your general business sense & perspective – “What would you do, and why”
★ Case #6: Gotcha!
1. Agency Compensation
Note: there is a “right” and “wrong” answer for Case #6 so tie the lecture to
the fact pattern of the case
★ Case #7: Play or Stay?
1. Agency P&L
2. Agency Compensation
•Your general business sense & perspective – “What would you do, and why”

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